Mobile phones and computer games were far in the future for children on Merseyside in the 1960s.

Books and comics fired the imagination, along with black-and-white TV and the wonderful pastime of ‘playing out.’

Games of football in the streets were commonplace along with cycle rides that could last for hours as long as you were back for tea!

A wonderful glimpse into childhood days of the past has been preserved in a series of pictures from the Liverpool Echo archive.

Light streams into a Liverpool primary school, April 1968

Light streams into a Liverpool primary school, April 1968

They range from children sitting in ordered rows of desks in a school classroom to bouncing on a space-hopper – remember the craze? – in West Derby.

There are pictures of children rehearsing their roles to welcome Princess Margaret and the lucky Liverpool girl who was chosen to be Miss Pears – the face of Pears soap.

The series starts with two photos taken in the late 1960s at a Church of England school in Liverpool. We’re not sure which one.

The first image shows a teacher helping younger children with their activities as the sun streams through the high windows of the Victorian building.

Peter Scott, 9, of West Derby bouncing around on a space hopper, April 1967

Peter Scott, 9, of West Derby bouncing around on a space hopper, April 1967

In the second, older children are intently reading the book New Worlds to Conquer. It may be the twelfth volume of Hamlyn’s History of the World in Colour – a familiar schoolbook.

Or, more fancifully, it could be Richard Halliburton’s ripping yarn of gold and high adventure in South America in the 1920s.

In it, Halliburton dives to the bottom of the Mayan Well of Death, climbs Mount Popocatepetl and visits Devil’s Island. Just the ticket when you’re stuck in the classroom on a wet afternoon!

Pictured out in the open is nine-year-old Peter Scott from West Derby, enjoying one of the latest crazes for kids – bouncing around on a space hopper.

Patricia Dinn, 3, practises welcoming Princess Margaret to Pringle Street, May 1969

Patricia Dinn, 3, practises welcoming Princess Margaret to Pringle Street, May 1969

Originally designed in Italy, space hoppers were manufactured in the UK by Mettoy-Corgi. They consisted of massive rubber balls, 24-28in in diameter, with handles on the top.

A small number of space hoppers were brought into the UK by returning holidaymakers, business people, members of the armed forces and the merchant navy before Mettoy started serious production in 1969.

Space hoppers were decidedly uncool for older youths. They preferred to while away their time outside the local chippie, as in our photo from Kirby in March 1965. A sixpenny bag of chips and a bottle of pop could be made to last at least an hour!

Hanging about was not on the agenda for children bustling around Pringle Street in Truebrook in May 1969, getting ready for the visit of Princess Margaret.

Three-year-old Justine Hornby of Formby is the new face of Pears soap, December 1969

Three-year-old Justine Hornby of Formby is the new face of Pears soap, December 1969

Especially proud was three-year-old Patricia Dinn, who was chosen to present a bouquet. She’s pictured with her friends rehearsing for the big day.

Pringle Street was to be only street in the city where Princess Margaret would make a stop.

Finally, two images of real charm from the 1960s – Miss Pears and some adorable husky puppies.

Three-year-old Justine Hornby of Formby, chosen to be the new face of Pears soap in December 1969, sits beneath her portrait following its unveiling at the Painters Hall, London.

Youths meet outside a fish and chip shop in Kirkby, March 1965

Youths meet outside a fish and chip shop in Kirkby, March 1965

Barbara Burrows and Beryl Simpson, both 11, with husky puppies at Chester Zoo, June 1960

Barbara Burrows and Beryl Simpson, both 11, with husky puppies at Chester Zoo, June 1960

And in June 1960, Barbara Burrows and Beryl Simpson, both aged 11 and both from St Helens, are pictured holding some of the huskies born at Chester Zoo.

The pups were just three weeks old when the photo was taken in the popular children’s corner at the zoo.

Children read at their desks in a Liverpool classroom, April 1968

Children read at their desks in a Liverpool classroom, April 1968