It wasn’t just the Beatles who put Liverpool on the map in the swinging ‘60s.

Everton Football Club were flying high too, winning two league championships and an FA Cup under the watchful eye of manager Harry Catterick.

Unlike Liverpool’s extrovert boss Bill Shankly, Catterick played his cards close to his chest. He listed his team players in alphabetical order so rival managers couldn’t guess his line-up.

Catterick hated televised games too as he thought they gave the opposition too much insight into how Everton played.

Former Everton left-half Tony Kay, August 1964

Former Everton left-half Tony Kay, August 1964

Shankly, on the other hand, loved TV. He reckoned the more opposing teams saw of Liverpool, the more frightened they’d become!

In spite of his media shyness, Catterick nurtured a highly successful style of cultured, attacking football at Goodison Park based on strict foundations. Some might even say authoritarian.

After his arrival from Sheffield Wednesday in 1961, Catterick steered Everton to the 1962-3 League Championship. The Toffees finished on 61 points – six ahead of nearest rivals Tottenham.

But it wasn’t all plain sailing. Problems off the field hit the headlines in 1964.

Tony Kay talks tactics with England manager Alf Ramsey, February 1964

Tony Kay talks tactics with England manager Alf Ramsey, February 1964

Everton player Tony Kay, signed from Sheffield Wednesday for £55,000 in 1962, was jailed after an investigation into match-fixing.

It had all started so well for Kay, a talented left-half who played once for England. He even scored in his single international match – an 8-1 drubbing of Switzerland in Basle.

Kay had made 31 league appearances for Everton in the 1963-4 season when the Sunday People broke the story about him betting against his own side while playing for Sheffield.

He was convicted on taped evidence – the first time it had been allowed in a British court – and sentenced to four months plus a £150 fine.

Joe Royle and Howard Kendall celebrate a goal against Liverpool, February 1968

Joe Royle and Howard Kendall celebrate a goal against Liverpool, February 1968

Kay was released after serving 10 months but the Football Association banned him from playing football for life.

The Everton left-half was not alone. Sheffield team mates David Layne and Peter Swan were also sentenced.

In all, more than 30 people were convicted with fixing various games in what became known as the British betting scandal.

Everton were back on the front foot in the 1965-6 season. They won the FA Cup by beating, ironically, Sheffield Wednesday 3-2 in the final at Wembley.

Brian Labone contests a high ball with West Brom’s Jeff Astle in the FA Cup Final, May 1968

Brian Labone contests a high ball with West Brom’s Jeff Astle in the FA Cup Final, May 1968

The 1967-8 season began well for the Toffees, but they’d dropped to seventh place by the time they faced local rivals Liverpool at Goodison Park on February 3rd.

Our photos show Everton ‘keeper Gordon West pulling off a brilliant save to deny Liverpool’s Chris Lawler, as well as Howard Kendall celebrating the only goal of the match with Joe Royle.

The 1-0 win lifted Everton into sixth place. They eventually finished fifth in the league with 52 points, one below fourth-placed Leeds United.

Everton fared better in the FA Cup that year, reaching the Wembley final where they lost 1-0 to West Bromwich Albion. Our image shows Brian Labone contesting a high ball with Baggies’ striker Jeff Astle, who scored in every round of the FA Cup that season.

Everton’s home-coming parade after the 1968 FA Cup Final leaves Allerton Station, May 1968

Everton’s home-coming parade after the 1968 FA Cup Final leaves Allerton Station, May 1968

Howard Kendall is closed down by Chelsea’s Alan Hudson, November 1969

Howard Kendall is closed down by Chelsea’s Alan Hudson, November 1969

The 1969-70 season saw Everton win their second league title of the decade. Their 66 point tally took them nine points clear of Leeds United and 11 points past third-placed Chelsea.

A pivotal match was the 1-1 away draw at Chelsea in November. Our photo shows Kendall getting to grips with Chelsea’s influential midfielder Alan Hudson. Everton’s goal on the day came from Jimmy Husband.

The final picture in our line-up, from a joyful Goodison Park dressing room, is one for all Everton fans to savour!

Champagne corks are popping after the team clinched the League Championship by beating West Brom 2-0 at the start of April.

Champagne in the dressing room for Everton’s league-winning team, April 1970

Champagne in the dressing room for Everton’s league-winning team, April 1970

Goalkeeper Gordon West saves from Liverpool’s Chris Lawler, February 1968

Goalkeeper Gordon West saves from Liverpool’s Chris Lawler, February 1968