One of the sweetest moments in Everton midfielder Colin Harvey’s long career arrived at precisely 3.41pm on Saturday September 19th 1964.

He’d just scored his side’s third goal in the 4-0 demolition of Liverpool at Anfield – and was jumping in the air in sheer delight.

No-one expected such a one-sided result even though Everton were fifth in the First Division and the Reds were languishing 14 places below them.

Everton’s ‘Holy Trinity’ of Alan Ball, Howard Kendall and Colin Harvey, January 1968

Everton’s ‘Holy Trinity’ of Alan Ball, Howard Kendall and Colin Harvey, January 1968

Bill Shankly’s Liverpool side were still a formidable outfit, including club legends Ron Yeats, Ian Callaghan, Roger Hunt and Ian St John.

But Harry Catterick’s team came flying out of the blocks – winger Derek Temple scored Everton’s first with barely 60 seconds on the clock!

Forward Fred Pickering added the second in the 35th minute and Johnny Morrissey rapped in the fourth with 26 minutes to go.

Alan Ball, left, and Howard Kendall, right, inspect the Wembley pitch before the 1968 FA Cup Final

Alan Ball, left, and Howard Kendall, right, inspect the Wembley pitch before the 1968 FA Cup Final

Everton won the return fixture 2-1 at Goodison Park and went on to finish fifth in the First Division with 49 points.

The Reds rallied to climb to seventh place with 44 points. They also won the FA Cup beating Leeds United 2-1 in the final.

Liverpool-born Harvey, who joined Everton as an apprentice in 1960, enjoyed his own moment of Cup Final glory at Wembley in May 1966.

Two-goal hero Mike Trebilcock is crowned by his team-mates after winning the FA Cup, May 1966

Two-goal hero Mike Trebilcock is crowned by his team-mates after winning the FA Cup, May 1966

The Toffees came from two goals down to beat Sheffield Wednesday 3-2 with Harvey playing a major role. Goal magazine described him as ‘a delightful player to watch.’

Harvey’s skill and finesse on the ball drew comparisons with Pele. Veteran commentator Kenneth Wolstenholme described him as ‘a beautiful footballer this boy.’

But Harvey really came into his own when he was joined in the midfield by World Cup winner Alan Ball in July 1966 and Howard Kendall in March 1967.

Colin Harvey in jubilant mood after scoring in the 4-0 win over Liverpool at Anfield, September 1964

Colin Harvey in jubilant mood after scoring in the 4-0 win over Liverpool at Anfield, September 1964

Together they formed the famous ‘Holy Trinity’, still revered by the Everton faithful.

Ball came from Blackpool for £112,000, a British record transfer fee, and Kendall was signed from Preston North End for £85,000.

The trio lined up together in the FA Cup final of 1968 against West Bromwich Albion at Wembley.

A gloomy Howard Kendall contemplates his runners-up medal after losing the 1968 FA Cup final

A gloomy Howard Kendall contemplates his runners-up medal after losing the 1968 FA Cup final

Everton were slight favourites, having beaten West Brom in both league matches. They won 2-1 at Goodison and thrashed the Baggies 6-2 at The Hawthorns.

But it was not to be on the day. The teams were locked at 0-0 at full time, with Jeff Astle scoring the winner in the third minute of extra time.

After such a near miss, Everton hit the bull’s eye in 1970. Harry Catterick’s side stormed the First Division, winning the league with 66 points – nine points ahead of second-placed Leeds.

Midfielder Alan Ball in action for Everton against Arsenal at Highbury, October 1970

Midfielder Alan Ball in action for Everton against Arsenal at Highbury, October 1970

Ironically, they clinched the title with a 2-0 victory against West Brom at Goodison Park on April 1st.

Harvey scored with a brilliant solo effort, described as one of the best-ever goals to win the league championship.

The ‘Holy Trinity’ broke up in December 1971 when Arsenal paid a record £220,000 to take Ball to Highbury. He’d made 208 appearances for Everton scoring 66 goals.

Howard Kendall, left, celebrates with Joe Royle after scoring against Liverpool, March 1968

Howard Kendall, left, celebrates with Joe Royle after scoring against Liverpool, March 1968

Harvey stayed on, eventually moving to Sheffield Wednesday in 1974. He made 384 appearances, scoring 24 goals.

Kendall left Everton for Birmingham City in 1974 after scoring 21 goals in 229 matches for the club.

But the story didn’t end there.

Kendall and Harvey were reunited in the 1980s to form the most successful managerial team in Everton’s history.

With Kendall at the helm and Harvey by his side, Everton won two league titles in 1984 and 1987, the FA Cup in 1984 and the European Cup Winners’ Cup in 1985.