A long-held myth was laid to rest when Liverpool visited New York on their 1964 American tour.

Contrary to popular belief, centre half Ron Yeats was not as tall as the Empire State building.

It had certainly seemed that way during the stunning 1963-4 season which saw the Reds win the First Division championship for the first time since 1947.

The Empire State building towers behind Liverpool players on their American tour, May 1964

The Empire State building towers behind Liverpool players on their American tour, May 1964

Club captain Yeats was a towering presence in a defence which only conceded 45 goals all season – a third less than runners-up Manchester United.

Little wonder the 6ft 2ins Scot earned the nickname ‘The Colossus’ from grateful fans.

Manager Bill Shankly went even further. When he signed Yeats from Dundee United in 1961, he told journalists: ‘The man is a mountain. Go into the dressing room and walk round him.’

Peter Thompson aiming to ‘bring home the bacon’ against Manchester United, April 1964

Peter Thompson aiming to ‘bring home the bacon’ against Manchester United, April 1964

Liverpool were no slouches in attack either. They notched up 92 league goals during the season – a record for the First Division.

Top scorer was Roger Hunt with 31, while fellow forward Ian St John managed 21 and Alf Arrowsmith 15.

Liverpool eventually won the league with 57 points with United second on 53. Local rivals Everton were third with 52 points and Tottenham fourth with 51.

Injured Roger Hunt pours the tea after Liverpool beat Burnley 3-0, April 1964

Injured Roger Hunt pours the tea after Liverpool beat Burnley 3-0, April 1964

The title was a supreme achievement for manager Shankly. Four years earlier, when the Scot took over, Liverpool were languishing in the Second Division.

After all the celebrations had died down in May, the victorious Liverpool team were rewarded with a five-week tour of Canada and the USA.

The goodwill trip had been organised by the American Soccer League to give football a boost on the other side of the Atlantic.

Bill Shankly jokes with players before they fly out on their American tour, May 1964

Bill Shankly jokes with players before they fly out on their American tour, May 1964

The only surprise was that Shankly didn’t travel with his team. He waved them off at Manchester’s Ringway Airport then headed north to Scotland to scout out new talent.

A highlight of the American tour was a visit to New York, where the players sampled bagels from a classic deli and climbed the Empire State Building.

Just as they had done throughout the remarkable season, Liverpool Echo photographers were there to capture the moment.

Champagne flows in the dressing room after Liverpool win the league, April 1964

Champagne flows in the dressing room after Liverpool win the league, April 1964

Their photos show Ronnie Moran, Ian Callaghan, Gerry Byrne and Alan A’Court crammed into a bustling New York café before stepping outside to view the Big Apple’s skyline.

Earlier photos portray turning points in the 1963-4 campaign. In September, Liverpool suffered a setback when they lost 2-1 to West Ham at Anfield.

Our picture shows scorer Roger Hunt trying to beat Hammers’ goalkeeper Jim Standen with England international Martin Peters making a well-timed block.

Ken Dodd clowns around in training with the Liverpool team, April 1964

Ken Dodd clowns around in training with the Liverpool team, April 1964

Fortunately, Liverpool turned things round the very next match by thrashing Wolverhampton Wanderers 6-0 at Anfield.

Hunt bagged two goals, with the others coming from Gordon Milne, Ian Callgahan, Ian St John and Peter Thompson.

There were a few blips after that – including a 3-0 defeat by Sheffield United and a 1-0 loss to Leicester City – but for the most part Liverpool were back on course.

This allowed room for a little humour. Winger Thompson was pictured in a butcher’s shop saying he’d ‘bring home the bacon’ against Manchester United when they met in the league.

Roger Hunt’s shot is blocked by West Ham’s Martin Peters at Anfield, September 1963

Roger Hunt’s shot is blocked by West Ham’s Martin Peters at Anfield, September 1963

He was as good as his word as Liverpool won 3-0 at Anfield with two goals from Arrowsmith and one from Callaghan!

The team were also buoyed by a visit from Knotty Ash comedian Ken Dodd, who turned up with his tickling stick at the Melwood training ground in April 1964.

Dodd quickly donned a Liverpool kit and took a comic turn in goal. There was more hard work to do, but everyone was smiling.

The grins couldn’t be broader by the end of the season.

Liverpool players try out a New York deli during their American tour, May 1964

Liverpool players try out a New York deli during their American tour, May 1964