There’s a strong feeling of déjà vu in the air about Everton and Liverpool football clubs this season.

With Everton’s resurgence and Liverpool’s dominance, both clubs could be heading for a new decade of shared glory.

It could be just like the 1960s and early 1970s when five league championships, three FA Cups and the UEFA Cup ended up in the respective trophy cabinets.

Everton manager Harry Catterick is hoisted shoulder-high with the FA Cup at Wembley, May 1966

Everton manager Harry Catterick is hoisted shoulder-high with the FA Cup at Wembley, May 1966

This time round it’s the turn of Jurgen Klopp and Carlo Ancelotti to be at the helm. Then it was Bill Shankly and Harry Catterick. Their reigns ran side by side for 12 eventful years.

Shankly joined the Reds in 1959 and was manager until 1974, winning the league title three times, the FA Cup twice and the UEFA Cup in 1973.

Catterick was Everton manager from 1961 to 1973. Under him, the Toffees were league champions twice and FA Cup winners in 1966.

New Everton signing Keith Newton playing table tennis with Harry Catterick, December 1969

New Everton signing Keith Newton playing table tennis with Harry Catterick, December 1969

While they both enjoyed success on the field, the two managers were vastly different in their character and approach to the game.

Shankly was a straight-talking, extrovert Scot who liked nothing better than getting covered in mud in the thick of training and then giving the press a powerful story.

Catterick was more reserved. He was canny with the press, playing his cards close to his chest. He even listed his team players in alphabetical order so rival managers couldn’t guess his line-up.

Everton players Ray Wilson, Sandy Brown, Alex Scott and Jimmy Gabriel with Harry Catterick at Speke Airport, August 1965

Everton players Ray Wilson, Sandy Brown, Alex Scott and Jimmy Gabriel with Harry Catterick at Speke Airport, August 1965

Shankly loved TV and televised games because he reckoned the more opposing teams saw of Liverpool, the more frightened they’d become . He hammered the point home by putting up the famous ‘This Is Anfield’ sign above the entrance to the pitch.

Catterick was the complete opposite. He bemoaned televised games as he thought the opposition would learn too much about Everton’s tactics.

But he laid down strict foundations at Goodison Park which proved the basis for Everton’s successful style of cultured and attacking football.

Harry Catterick films his players with the League Championship trophy, August 1963

Harry Catterick films his players with the League Championship trophy, August 1963

Born in Darlington in November 1919, Catterick played centre forward for Everton and Crewe Alexandra before managing at Crewe, Rochdale and Sheffield Wednesday.

After taking over at Everton from Johnny Carey in 1961, Catterick steered the club to the 1962-3 League Championship. The Toffees finished on 61 points – six ahead of nearest rivals Tottenham.

There was more success for Catterick in the 1996 FA Cup Final which saw Everton beat Sheffield Wednesday 3-2 with two goals from Mike Trebilcock and one from Derek Temple.

Former managers Bill Shankly and Harry Catterick meet at the Adelphi Hotel, October 1975

Former managers Bill Shankly and Harry Catterick meet at the Adelphi Hotel, October 1975

After narrowly losing the 1968 FA Cup Final 1-0 to West Bromwich Albion, the Toffees bounced back to win the 1969-70 league championship with a record points total of 66, nine ahead of runners-up Leeds United.

But fault lines started to show in the next 18 months. Alan Ball was sold to Arsenal in December 1971 and morale dipped. Catterick’s health was affected and he suffered a heart attack in January 1972.

Catterick took a non-executive role at the club in April 1973 before leaving to manage Preston North End in August 1975. A great era for the club had ended.

Manager Bill Shankly takes charge of pre-season training at Melwood, July 1972

Manager Bill Shankly takes charge of pre-season training at Melwood, July 1972

Born in Glenbuck, Ayrshire, in September 1913, Bill Shankly played right half for Carlisle United and Preston before managing at Carlisle, Grimsby Town, Workington and Huddersfield Town.

He took the reins at Second Division Liverpool in 1959 and led them to promotion and the top flight in 1962. What followed was a whirlwind of domestic and, finally, European achievement.

The Reds were First Division champions in 1964, 1966 and 1973 – on the first occasion beating Manchester United and Everton into second and third place.

 Bill Shankly and his team celebrate beating Arsenal at Anfield to clinch the league title, April 1964

Bill Shankly and his team celebrate beating Arsenal at Anfield to clinch the league title, April 1964

Leeds United were second to Liverpool in the league in 1966 and were in third place behind Arsenal in 1973. It’s fair to say Leeds manager Don Revie enjoyed many a dogfight with Shankly and Catterick before taking the England job in 1974.

Shankly’s Liverpool team won the FA Cup in 1965 and 1974, and the UEFA Cup in 1973 when they beat Bayern Munich 3-2 over two legs. Shankly considered the German team the finest in Europe at the time.

The 1974 FA Charity Shield at Wembley was the last time Shankly led out his beloved Liverpool team.

A muddy Bill Shankly and Joe Fagan playing five-a-side on eve of the FA Cup Final, April 1965

A muddy Bill Shankly and Joe Fagan playing five-a-side on eve of the FA Cup Final, April 1965

He was succeeded by trusted assistant Bob Paisley and died seven years later at the age of 68.

*Hundreds of remarkable pictures from around Britain during World War II will feature in Clive Hardy’s latest book The Home Front – 1939 to 1945, available soon from our online shop.