When Beatlemania gripped the country in the early 1960s, it wasn’t just the Fab Four’s music that made a splash.

Everything from wallpaper and waxworks to toys and tribute bands became part of the Merseyside phenomenon.

Even hairsprays got the Beatles’ treatment, along with brooches, necklaces, buttons, books, pens, pencils and serving trays!

There was no escaping Beatlemania, although there is some debate on when the term was first coined.

Mail piles up at George Harrison’s house on his 21st birthday, February 1964

Mail piles up at George Harrison’s house on his 21st birthday, February 1964

Many believe it started after the Beatles appeared on the prime time TV show Val Parnell’s Sunday Night at the London Palladium on October 13th, 1963.

More than 15 million viewers saw the band perform their single She Loves You, complete with the ‘yeah, yeah, yeah’ chorus and falsetto ‘oohs’ while they shook their mop-top hair.

The nation had seen nothing like it – and promptly went wild! One newspaper printed the headline Beatlemania to describe the delirium. The term stuck!

Scottish music promoter Andi Lothian claims he used the word first six days earlier when speaking to a reporter after the Beatles’ concert at Caird Hall, Dundee.

Actresses Sheila O’Neill, Pamela Hart, Dora Bryan and Amanda Barrie play the Beatles, August 1963

Actresses Sheila O’Neill, Pamela Hart, Dora Bryan and Amanda Barrie play the Beatles, August 1963

Whatever its origins, the term accurately summed up the hysteria that had been building in the North West since the Beatles first played the Cavern Club in 1961.

Perhaps its oddest manifestation was the Beatles’ bedroom wallpaper produced by Wall Paper Manufacturers Ltd of Manchester. A single roll of it went on sale on ebay recently for £279.99p!

Our photo shows Margaret Stewart (24) and Jean Evans (17) admiring it at an exhibition in March 1964 after they’d just bought a Beatles’ hairspray!

The Beatles really knew they’d arrived when Madame Tussauds created waxworks of them. Judge for yourselves from our photo how lifelike they were!

Instruments on display at Crane’s music shop in Liverpool, May 1964

Instruments on display at Crane’s music shop in Liverpool, May 1964

Liverpool comedian Ken Dodd caused a stir when he took them on the set of TV show Juke Box Jury in May 1964.

Another imitation of the Beatles appeared in August 1963, when the revue show Six of One came to Liverpool before moving to London’s West End.

Actresses Sheila O’Neill, Pamela Hart, Dora Bryan and Amanda Barrie added a routine which saw the four of them play a popular Beatles’ number. We’re not sure which one, but they certainly looked the part!

Beatlemania inspired a host of Merseyside youngsters to try to follow in the footsteps of the Fab Four. Our photo shows some of them peering through the window of Cranes music shop in May 1964.

Youngsters mill around the NEMS music shop owned by Brian Epstein, June 1964

Youngsters mill around the NEMS music shop owned by Brian Epstein, June 1964

Perfect for every bedroom - Beatles wallpaper, March 1964

Perfect for every bedroom – Beatles wallpaper, March 1964

Gerry and the Pacemakers’ new album How Do You Like it is on display along with a range of instruments, including a classic Hammond organ for £550.

Who knows, six guineas for a guitar and a copy of Bert Weedon’s Play in a Day manual might have been all that stood between them and possible fame and fortune.

There were similar scenes in June 1964 as youngsters milled around outside the North End Music Stores in Liverpool, a shop owned by Beatles’ manager Brian Epstein.

Finally, for sheer adulation, it was hard to beat the number of cards that arrived at George Harrison’s Liverpool home on his 21st birthday in February 1964.

His parents Louise and Harold were simply bowled over as postmen delivered crate after crate of tributes from adoring fans!

Ken Dodd brings waxwork Beatles to the TV show Juke Box Jury, May 1964

Ken Dodd brings waxwork Beatles to the TV show Juke Box Jury, May 1964

George Harrison at the Liverpool premiere of It’s a Hard Day’s Night, July 1964

George Harrison in Liverpool, for the Northern Premiere of “A Hard Day’s Night”. 10 July 1964.