It was a wet summer when Old Trafford first welcomed the Pakistan cricket team to these shores in July 1954.

The newly formed nation was playing its first Test series against England – and conditions did not suit the visitors.

The Manchester skies were overcast when England captain David Sheppard, deputizing for Len Hutton, won the toss and chose to bat in the Third Test.

England made 293 runs for six wickets on the first day with Denis Compton scoring 93 and Tom Graveney 65. Rain ruled out play completely on the second day.

On the third morning, England batted for an hour before declaring on 359 for eight. Pakistan started brightly but the rain-affected pitch favoured England’s bowlers.

Pakistan celebrate as England’s Andrew Flintoff is caught on the boundary at Old Trafford, June 2003

Pakistan celebrate as England’s Andrew Flintoff is caught on the boundary at Old Trafford, June 2003

Johnny Wardle took four wickets for 19 runs and debutante Jim McConnon made four impressive catches as well as taking three wickets.

Pakistan were dismissed for 90 and forced to follow on. They were in real trouble – four wickets down and only 25 runs on the board – when the Manchester weather came to their rescue.

The final two days were washed out and the match ended in a draw. The series finished 1-1 with Pakistan becoming the first side to win a Test on an inaugural tour of England.

Pakistan were back at Old Trafford in June 1987 for the First Test in a five-match series.

The visitors won the toss and elected to field. England scored 447 in their first innings and Pakistan were 140 for five when, once again, rain stopped play.

Imran Nazir and Mohammad Hafeez take runs off England bowler James Anderson, June 2003

Imran Nazir and Mohammad Hafeez take runs off England bowler James Anderson, June 2003

The match ended in a draw, but Pakistan won the series 1-0 with a single victory at Headingley. It was the first time Pakistan had won a series against England in England.

Five years later, in July 1992, Old Trafford hosted the Third Test against a strong Pakistan side who raced to 388 for three on the first day.

The second day was lost to rain. Pakistan eventually declared on 505 for nine after Aamir Sohail had scored 205. It was his first Test century –and he doubled it!

England made 309 in reply with Graham Gooch scoring 78, but the match petered out into a draw. Pakistan won the series 2-1.

It was a different story in May 2001 when Pakistan played the second match of a brief two-Test series in Manchester.

A jubilant Shoaib Malik bowls England’s Rikki Clarke for a duck at Old Trafford, June 2003

A jubilant Shoaib Malik bowls England’s Rikki Clarke for a duck at Old Trafford, June 2003

Pakistan recorded their first Test victory at Old Trafford by winning a rain-interrupted match by 108 runs.

Man of the match was Pakistan’s Inzamam-ul-Huq who scored 114 and 85 in his two innings. England’s Mike Atherton passed the milestone of 7,500 Test runs.

It was roles reversed at Old Trafford in July 2006 as England thrashed Pakistan by an innings and 120 runs.

The dangerous Inzamam was caught for a duck by Kevin Pietersen as Pakistan were dismissed for 119 in their first innings. Spin bowler Monty Panesar took five wickets.

Alastair Cook and Ian Bell both made hundreds for England, who declared on 461.

Matthew Hoggard of England fielding against Pakistan in the Second Test at Old Trafford, June 2001

Matthew Hoggard of England fielding against Pakistan in the Second Test at Old Trafford, June 2001

Panesar took another five wickets in Pakistan’s second innings and wicket keeper Geraint Jones made five catches despite playing with a fractured finger.

The four-match series was marred by a ball-tampering controversy on the fourth day of the final Test at The Oval which saw Pakistan refuse to take the field after the tea interval.

The umpires awarded the match to England which meant they won the series 3-0.

As well as Test matches, Pakistan have played a number of One-Day Internationals at Old Trafford. The first took place in May 1978.

England won by a margin of 132 runs after bowling Pakistan out for 85 in 47 overs. David Gower and Clive Radley both made their one-day debuts.

New Zealand’s Matthew Horne is bowled by Pakistan’s Abdul Razzaq in the World Cup semi-final at Old Trafford, June 1999

New Zealand’s Matthew Horne is bowled by Pakistan’s Abdul Razzaq in the World Cup semi-final at Old Trafford, June 1999

It was a similar story when the two teams met in a one-day international at Old Trafford in July 1982. England won by 73 runs after making 295 for eight. Top scorer was Mike Gatting with 76.

The result was much closer at Old Trafford in June 2003. England made 204 for nine from 50 overs with Andrew Flintoff top-scoring with 39.

Pakistan mounted a spirited reply with Mohammad Hafeez hitting 69 – and it all came down to the final over. The visitors scrambled home, winning by two wickets with four balls remaining.

Shoaib Akhtar makes a brilliant catch against New Zealand in the World Cup semi-final at Old Trafford, June 1999

Shoaib Akhtar takes Chris Harris’ wicket June 1999
during the World Cup semi final Pakistan v New Zealand match at Old Trafford

Finally, Old Trafford holds special memories for Pakistan for the part it played in their 1999 Cricket World Cup campaign.

They beat India by 47 runs at the ground in a thrilling one-day World Cup knockout match on June 8th and then hammered New Zealand in the semi-final at Old Trafford eight days later.

Saeed Amwar races off the pitch after victory against New Zealand in the World Cup semi-final at Old Trafford, June 1999

Saeed Amwar races off the pitch after victory against New Zealand in the World Cup semi-final at Old Trafford, June 1999

New Zealand scored a respectable 241 for seven, but Pakistan played superb cricket to win by nine wickets with nearly three overs to spare. Man of the match was Saeed Anwar who made 113 not out.

Pakistan’s luck was out in the final at Lord’s. They scored only 132 and were comprehensively beaten by Australia who won by eight wickets.

Azhar Mahmood celebrates Pakistan’s win against India in the World Cup at Old Trafford, June 1999

Azhar Mahmood celebrates Pakistan’s win against India in the World Cup at Old Trafford, June 1999

England’s Andrew Flintoff appeals in vain against Pakistan at Old Trafford, June 2003

England’s Andrew Flintoff appeals in vain against Pakistan at Old Trafford, June 2003.