Then & Now – St Ann’s Square Models

Welcome to Then and Now, where each week we compare images of Manchester and Merseyside streets, landmarks and buildings from bygone days with how they look now. This week our image shows models Sue Dexter, left, and Jane Powell sporting the latest trends for the Manchester Festival of May 1973.

queen

The Queen Visits Bolton

Plus, nurses protest over salary and working conditions, and Manchester United’s George Best leaves keeper floundering

Then & Now – Prince’s Dock, Liverpool

Welcome again to Then and Now, where each week we compare images of Manchester and Merseyside streets, landmarks and buildings from bygone days with how they look today. This week we focus on Prince’s Dock, Liverpool in January 1966 looking towards the Royal Liver Building.

The Beatles watch a TV recording of their stage concert, December 1965

Beatles’ Swansong

iNostalgia looks back on the Beatles’ memorable final concert on Merseyside

It’s City’s League Cup after a 2-1 win over West Bromwich Albion in the Wembley final, March 1970

Tony Book

iNostalgia looks back on Manchester City skipper Tony Book’s late arrival in the big time

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Then & Now – St Ann’s Square Models

Then & Now – St Ann’s Square Models

Welcome to Then and Now, where each week we compare images of Manchester and Merseyside streets, landmarks and buildings from bygone days with how they look now. This week our image shows models Sue Dexter, left, and Jane Powell sporting the latest trends for the Manchester Festival of May 1973.

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Then and Now

King Street, Manchester

Welcome to Then and Now, where each week we compare images of Manchester and Merseyside streets, landmarks and buildings from bygone days with how they look now.

This week our main image shows people trudging down a snowy King Street in the 1970s, probably seeking cover in one of the many shops.

Modern King Street is now home to some of Manchester’s smartest outlets, boasting well-known designer names. A few can be glimpsed in photographer Nicola Mazzuia’s 2019 picture.

But back in Manchester’s Victorian heyday, the street featured the grand Town Hall, which in turn became the Central Library. The original Town Hall was replaced by a new building in Albert Square.

Then Now

Social Nostalgia

2 days ago

iNostalgia

Introducing Annie Horniman, one of the inspirational women featured in our new book 'First in the Fight'.
Annie was a pioneer in the world of theatre, choosing to focus on the arts rather than dedicating her life to politics. Her passion for the theatre was ignited after seeing her first play, Shakespeare's 'The Merchant of Venice'. This led to Annie producing and funding progressive and powerful pieces of theatre later in her life.
Annie embraced modern changes and travelled Europe on a bicyle (on the robust male-framed bicycle, not the frames designed for women which she hated). On her return to the UK she found a home for the Irish National Playwright Society and ourchased the Gaiety Theatre in Manchester, which put on progressive performances until 1917.
Annie was made a Companion of Honour in 1933 and maintained her eccentricity until her death in 1937. Despite facing criticism throughout her life, Annie stayed true to herself in the way she chose to live her life, making her a true inspiration for women today.

If you love Annie's story, check out our new book 'First in the Fight' which features stories of twenty radical Manchester women, each accompanied by a beautiful and original illustration from the 'Women in Print' collective. The perfect gift for the inspiring person in your life.

https://inostalgia.co.uk/product/…
... See MoreSee Less

Introducing Annie Horniman, one of the inspirational women featured in our new book First in the Fight.
Annie was a pioneer in the world of theatre, choosing to focus on the arts rather than dedicating her life to politics. Her passion for the theatre was ignited after seeing her first play, Shakespeares The Merchant of Venice. This led to Annie producing and funding progressive and powerful pieces of theatre later in her life. 
Annie embraced modern changes and travelled Europe on a bicyle (on the robust male-framed bicycle, not the frames designed for women which she hated). On her return to the UK she found a home for the Irish National Playwright Society and ourchased the Gaiety Theatre in Manchester, which put on progressive performances until 1917.
Annie was made a Companion of Honour in 1933 and maintained her eccentricity until her death in 1937. Despite facing criticism throughout her life, Annie stayed true to herself in the way she chose to live her life, making her a true inspiration for women today. 
If you love Annies story, check out our new book First in the Fight which features stories of twenty radical Manchester women, each accompanied by a beautiful and original illustration from the Women in Print collective. The perfect gift for the inspiring person in your life. 
https://inostalgia.co.uk/product/first-in-the-fight/Image attachmentImage attachment

3 days ago

iNostalgia

BLACK FRIDAY OFFER! MUST END T̶U̶E̶S̶D̶A̶Y̶ ̶3̶R̶D̶ ̶D̶E̶C̶E̶M̶B̶E̶R̶! FRIDAY 6TH DECEMBER!

EXTENDED OFFER!

Good news! We have extended our Black Friday offer. Get any of the books below for £9.99 including free UK postage.

To see our full range of products and offers, head to www.inostalgia.co.uk/shop
... See MoreSee Less

BLACK FRIDAY OFFER! MUST END T̶U̶E̶S̶D̶A̶Y̶ ̶3̶R̶D̶ ̶D̶E̶C̶E̶M̶B̶E̶R̶!  FRIDAY 6TH DECEMBER!
EXTENDED OFFER!
Good news! We have extended our Black Friday offer. Get any of the books below for £9.99 including free UK postage. 
To see our full range of products and offers, head to www.inostalgia.co.uk/shop

2 weeks ago

iNostalgia

Last month at the Zion Arts Centre in Hulme, a re-enactment production featuring Nicola Gardener (from Coronation Street and Emmerdale), took place to showcase the vital contributions families from the Windrush generation made to the NHS: Windrush Women- the backbone of the NHS.

Between the 40s and 70s, people from the Caribbean were brought to the UK to help fill post-war labour shortages; many of those women were given roles within the NHS. One of these women was Louise Da-Cocodia who moved from Jamaica in 1955. She spent over 30 years working for the NHS and became the first black Senior Nursing Officer in Manchester. 'Mrs D', as she is so famously known around South Manchester, achieved many things during her life; her contribution to the NHS just being one of them. This production by The Community Centre and The Louise Da-Cocodia Education Trust showcased the invaluable effect many women like Louise had on the NHS.

Years after, it is still imperative to acknowledge these important contributions to society and in particular the NHS as even years after her death, Louise Da-Cocodia's impact is still making a difference to the education and welfare of BME in and around Manchester. Her story is said to teach the message of hard work and perseverance no matter the circumstance hence why, in the years following her death Louise was long-listed as one of the 20 women to be considered for the first female statue in Manchester since 1901.
Although she wasn't gifted the statue, it's crucial to remember and learn from the impactful women of the past thus her feature in 'First in the Fight'- a book about 20 women who made Manchester.
... See MoreSee Less

Last month at the Zion Arts Centre in Hulme, a re-enactment production featuring Nicola Gardener (from Coronation Street and Emmerdale), took place to showcase the vital contributions families from the Windrush generation made to the NHS: Windrush Women- the backbone of the NHS.
Between the 40s and 70s, people from the Caribbean were brought to the UK to help fill post-war labour shortages; many of those women were given roles within the NHS. One of these women was Louise Da-Cocodia who moved from Jamaica in 1955. She spent over 30 years working for the NHS and became the first black Senior Nursing Officer in Manchester. Mrs D, as she is so famously known around South Manchester, achieved many things during her life; her contribution to the NHS just being one of them. This production by The Community Centre and The Louise Da-Cocodia Education Trust showcased the invaluable effect many women like Louise had on the NHS.
Years after, it is still imperative to acknowledge these important contributions to society and in particular the NHS as even years after her death, Louise Da-Cocodias impact is still making a difference to the education and welfare of BME in and around Manchester. Her story is said to teach the message of hard work and perseverance no matter the circumstance hence why, in the years following her death Louise was long-listed as one of the 20 women to be considered for the first female statue in Manchester since 1901.
Although she wasnt gifted the statue, its crucial to remember and learn from the impactful women of the past thus her feature in First in the Fight- a book about 20 women who made Manchester.Image attachment

 

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A Tribute,,(,a statue,) ,would be good And in the not to distant future.

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Please help us to relay (pun intended!) #OurEmmeline’s message across Twitter: will you help us to ask businesses to support staff suffering domestic violence? Please retweet to encourage businesses to #SignThePledge for #16DaysofAction

BLACK FRIDAY OFFER! MUST END FRIDAY 6TH DECEMBER!

Good news! We have extended our #BlackFriday offer. Get any of the books below for £9.99 including free UK postage.

To see our full range of products, head to https://t.co/KnDLW5NeWj

#Manchester #Liverpool #Newcastle

We did it #OurEmmeline! Gold #PRideNW for Best Arts, Culture or Sport Campaign with @Andrew4Didsbury and the Emmeline Pankhurst Statute Committee @HazelReeves @HelenPankhurst

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iNostalgia is a small publishing company based in Manchester. We’re a group of experienced publishers, editors and writers who believe passionately in recording local heritage

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